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20100930
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
that every election is a choice. if you have to run against the ideal, if it's a referendum, every one of us will get beats. we'd have nobody in office because there's no such thing as the perfect public servant. the choices you make in politics are like the choices you make in life. you make the best available choice. >> that's an interesting insight into the obama's strategy. he talked about how what obama is doing is to try to draw mitch mcconnell and john boehner on to television where they aren't so good and expose them as part of the no team. part of a long interview we did today. part of an upcoming documentary. by the way, that was taped today at the clinton institute on american politics, university college dublin. one of the many institutes being set up by the former president. >>> james clyburn said if republicans win the house, they'll use subpoena power to try to delegitimize president obama. darrell issa said he was being paranoid and goofy. up next, we'll ask iss what what republicans are planning to do with the power that he will have in his hand. you're watching "hardball" f
. thanks to you at home for staying with us for the next hour. we begin tonight with what they said could never be done. they said that wedge issues only wedge one way. if you are a democratic politician, if you've got a culture warrior opponent, you essentially just have to take it. they can win points with their base for being super antiabortion, super antigay and all the rest but there is no way that you as a liberal, you as a democrat can raise those issues from the other side. sorry. you just can't do it. don't bother. you can campaign against reproductive rights. republicans have made an art form of that in recent years but you can't campaign for reproductive rights. that just can't be done. this is how the culture war has settled out over the past decade or so. campaign all you want against all sorts of civil libertarian issues. you can campaign against gay people. you can campaign against religious freedom for anyone who is not your particular brand of christian. you can campaign against reproductive rights. but you can't campaign for these things. that's the common wisdom. they s
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. the u.s. treasury and insurance giant a.i.g. unveiled a plan today to speed up the repayment of more than $100 billion in federal bailout money. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, economic writers louise story of the "new york times" and roben farzad of "bloomberg business week" weigh the pluses and minuses of the deal. >> brown: then, kwame holman looks at the down-to-the-wire scramble as congress pushed to adjourn just weeks ahead of the midterm elections. >> suarez: judy woodruff talks to speaker of the house nancy pelosi about the battle over tax cuts and the stakes for democrats in november. >> our members left congress last night. they are confident that they would return in the majority. >> brown: special correspondent miles o'brien reports on a mississippi community's plan to use stimulus money for mass transit in rural areas. >> suarez: betty ann bowser updates the johnson and johnson story as company executives and the f.d.a. come under fire on capitol hill fo
the line? >> the fbi has long used them as an example, has long had resources devoted to both. i will tell you going back to 2007 and 2008, they have had to devote increasing resources to this domestic extremist. we've seen cases, we've seen arrests in places like michigan as a result of those resources. >> bart, there's two big issues in your piece. number one, these groups, militia groups that have spread up under the patriot banner, if you will, correct me if i'm mischaracterizing it. then the lone wolfs, people who radicalized themselves and share information on the internet. one of them is the holocaust museum shooter. you say in your reporting, i made phone calls to verify this, that he shot the guard in the holocaust museum, but they found that he wanted to kill david axelrod, the president's top adviser. >> that's absolutely right. he considered a number of targets and he thought the president, himself, was too hard to get to. in his world view the jews ran everything, obama was a puppet on what he called his jew owners. in that sense axelrod was a more valuable target to him than
at that closed door meeting with the president. what have you learned? >> democratic congressional leaders used that strategy session at the white house today to press the president to be more aggressive in helping them campaign in the final weeks before november's elections. i'm told that house speaker nancy pelosi spoke up and said the congressional democrats really want to see him do more of the kind of rally he held in wisconsin this week where he amped up the rhetoric for democratic policies and against republicans especially when it comes to the issue of jobs and the economy. i'm told that in this meeting, the president made clear there would be more campaign events coming, more are already actually on the books beyond the three rallies that have been as publicly in neve metro, pennsylvania, ohio. these sources we talked to insist the tone of the meeting was not hostile. however, democratic congressional leaders did want to hear the promise directly from the president's lips he was going to help them. i can tell you that congressional democratic sources i talked to for some timex pressed
made us look twice. tony curtis was born bernard schwartz on june 3, 1925, in new york. his relationship with his parents was less than smooth. his dad was an immigrant tailor who forced his son to work for him. curtis' neurotic mother was hard to deal with at times. his younger brother was killed in a road accident at the age of 9. a few years later, another brother was born who would eventually be diagnosed as schizophrenic. tony grew tired of his family life and at 17 he joined the u.s. navy. his navy stint brought him around the world though he never saw combat. toward the end of the 1940's, he returned home and quickly started acting classes. after a theater agent saw him in the greenwich village production of "golden boy" curtis was signed to a seven year contract with universal pictures. in 1949, curtis landed his first role in crisscross where he danced. two years later, he was given a leading role in "the prince who was a thief." that same year, curtis married actress janet leigh, a marriage that would last a decade. they had two daughters. one well known actress ja
the child of the rapist. if your opponent has used that extreme, throw out the conventional wisdom. you can run against somebody on that basis. it can be done. >> common forms of birth control illegal. >> it is ridiculous. >> i cannot believe that 2010 they want to limit access to birth control. >> if this is reaching so far into people's private lives. >> who is he to make that choice? >> he does not belong in my family planning. >> they said it couldn't be done. it can be done. republican senate candidate also remember of forcing women to bear the rapist's child. >>. >> on a response. who says a teenage rape victim should be forced to have the baby? sharon angle, just too extreme. >> one other of these ads. this is a democrat dan seals in going after his opponent, robert dole on the same issue. >> this is for dan seals? newspapers call him independent, impressive. who's behind him? a group that opposes abortion even in cases of rape, incest, and the 2-party said that is behind. >> what bad example means for democrats running. get hit in that ad, does not actually have an anti-choice recor
's the first time i've ever enjoyed the u.s. open in tennis. >> reporter: jeanne moos, cnn. >> they're going to start this on golf now. >> reporter: new york. >> all right. that does it for us. see you back here tomorrow. t.j. holmes in for tony harris today? >> hey there, thank you so much. they serve a lot of liquor i think at the u.s. open. all right. kyra, we'll talk to you again soon. we are starting anew this center live at the world headquarters in atlanta, georgia. let me tell you what we have on the rundown on thursday september, 30th. we have to start this with story out of rutgers, a freshman at the school apparently jumps to his death after a gay encounter is secretly streamed live on the internet and two classmates are now facing charges. >> i read it on-line i was like -- i was shocked. >> also, coming up, food made in a laboratory. scientists want this piggy to go to the market, but maybe then he could go straight to your dinner plate. >> what i can tell the american public no food from a genetically engineered animal will go on the market unless the fda has demonstrated -- >>
journal" poll that 86% of americans think that u.s. companies outsource too much. putting the puzzle together, the republicans don't give a damn. republicans would rather see american companies hire workers in china than give americans, who have, well, nothing. give them a measly $300 check to get them through the next week. the party who pretends to be, let's see, christian, valued, wrap themselves in the flag, and blast these lee greenwood songs along every campaign, really they're just nothing but fraudulent in my opinion. there's nothing more american or christian than helping out your fellow man when they fall on hard times and we're in the midst of hard times. republicans have proven that they have no economic patriotism and only worship at the altar of the almighty dollar. so this election, and we'll talk a lot about this on the march in saturday in washington, this is really about the soul of the country, isn't it? i'm not convinced that it's base versus base because there's a lot of people that are caught in the middle of this economic strife that didn't think that they were
. >> young people have access to all technology. and they have the ability, unlike us, to use it. they know intuitively how to use these things. they don't have the ethics developed in life to understand -- obviously it's an extreme case of right and wrong. >> they can't figure out what strikes these kids as a prank ends up being something that costs a live. >> so ease sy to do. >> what is the nerve that hit everybody and us that made us say, that is the saddest thing? what is it here that is getting to us so much. >> i don't know. i think the kid -- >> the kid, kind of awkward, quiet sort of kid. >> played the violin. >> i also think he was struggling with his sexuality. it was a leap for him to do what he was doing in privacy and then to have it broadcast -- >> it's a type of bullying. >> which is so prevalent today. >> it went from zero to 200 miles an hour he was bullied and brought down by his own fears because they were plastered across the internet for everybody that he knows who is important to him to see. it's unbelievably cruel. >> probably including a lot of people who had no ide
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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